4 million views on BNC

4 million views on BNC

Today this modest climate + energy blog passed 4 million page views.

My thanks to all the regular guest posters and commenters on BNC for building up and critiquing the archives of content — 550 posts and rising.

This blog has been dedicated to the enormous challenge of replacing fossil fuels by mid century.  That goal continues. Whatever our core future energy generation sources turn out to be –  nuclear or renewables – if we can solve the ‘sustainable energy problem’, the possibilities for humanity are many and exciting.

So let’s keep thinking, and debating, and advocating, for good policy and smart use of technology. The biosphere depends on us getting this right. As does the prosperity of our own species. Onward!

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11 Comments

  1. I don’t believe the species is mature enough for nuclear. I don’t believe “renewables” can be the path. I believe we will live at the energy level of the middle ages. Here are some essays in support of my thoughts

    Solar and wind capturing devices are not alternative energy sources. For the renewable devices – wind, photovoltaices, solar hot water, hot air panels – the sun and wind are there, are green, are sustained. The devices used to capture the sun and wind’s energy are an extension of the fossil fuel supply system.

    There is a massive infrastructure of mining, processing, manufacturing, fabricating, installation, transportation and the associated environmental assaults. There would be no sun or wind capturing devices with out this infrastructure. This infrastructure is not green, sustainable, or renewable. The making of the these devices inadvertently but directly supports fracking, tar sands and deep ocean drilling because of the need for this infrastructure.

    I invite you to view these essays.
    This essay has diagrams and pictures of how we get copper, aluminum, glass, black chrome – the chemicals, heavy machinery, and industrial processes that are necessary to make the devices to capture the energy of the sun and wind.
    http://sunweber.blogspot.com/2011/12/machines-making-machines-making.html
    and
    http://sunweber.blogspot.com/2014/03/reality-again.html
    and
    http://sunweber.blogspot.com/2014/02/solar-investing.html
    And even if you could get around the environmental degradation, the low ERoEI and could amass enough extra energy to reproduce the capturing devices and their equipment, then how about the rest of the STUFF of high tech, high energy society?

    http://sunweber.blogspot.com/2011/10/to-make-light-bulb.html
    and
    http://sunweber.blogspot.com/2013/10/a-small-fan.html

    http://sunweber.blogspot.com/2011/05/new-middle-ages.html

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  2. Yes. BNC is a fantastic resource. It’s a pity Barry lost interest a year or so ago and people have move elsewhere. I’d also like to see a greatly improved (easier to read) interface, and especially an index to previous posts with title, author and link to the article as used to be easily available from the “Sustainable Nuclear” and “Renewables Limits” tabs.

    This blog has been dedicated to the enormous challenge of replacing fossil fuels by mid century.

    It’s a real pity that the BNC 4 million page views has been achieved at the same time as B&W has slashed its SMR development program:

    Nuclear technology supplier Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) has slashed funding for its Generation mPower program, an effort to develop a small modular reactor (SMR) for power generation and other applications. The pullback represents a major blow to the development of SMRs, which have been hailed as the next step forward for the nuclear power industry.

    Read the artcicle here: http://www.forbes.com/sites/pikeresearch/2014/04/28/mpower-pullback-stalls-small-nuclear/

    IMO, this is very bad news for the short term and medium future for nuclear power and for a realistic possibility of cutting global CO2 emissions from electricity by 50% by say 2060.

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  3. Fukushima was a huge load to carry, in many ways. Barry, your site’s contribution to the ensuing debate was and is a giant achievement bordering on superhuman. There is no need to apologise for taking a breather after that frantic year or more.

    The next couple of years promise to be very interesting, at least in Australia. I’m optimistic that the public will tire of three word slogans and anti-science stances from politicians, that they will come to respect opinion based on knowledge and that policy without reasoned analysis will be rejected… at least, regarding energy, science and climate issues.

    So, thanks for the sometimes wild ride past the first 4 million hits, Barry.

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  4. I am sure Barry didn’t “lose interest” so much as “run out of steam”. We have to realise that he has a very demanding “day job” mainly concentrating on his ARC Future Fellowship conservation biology work, which requires a huge workload and constant publishing of papers etc.
    And let’s not forget he also has a wife and two sons with whom he likes to spend time.
    BNC is a testament to his commitment to finding a solution to the problem and looming disaster of climate change. 4 million hits is to be celebrated and I congratulate Barry on his success in reaching such a wide audience.
    Superhuman indeed singleton engineer :-)

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  5. To get off the fossil fuels, the world needs a balanced energy portfolio. Further development is required in
    Nuclear power for concentrated loads in cities and industrial centers.
    Wind and solar with local storage as a distributed generation.
    The Australia, one of major uranium producers, does not use any nuclear energy
    It sells India, one of the big energy hungry neighbors coal but not uranium
    The current reactor construction is concentrated in highly populated parts of Asia, as expected. Australia, a bigger producer like Russia, should also use this energy.

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