Categories
GR Impacts Nuclear

What can we learn from Kerala?

Guest Post by Geoff Russell. Geoff recently released the popular book “Greenjacked! The derailing of environmental action on climate change“. Kerala is a state on the South Western coast of India; about a third the size of Tasmania or just slightly bigger than Hawaii. It’s been on my radar ever since it featured in an inspirational […]

Categories
Future Nuclear Policy

Current World Energy Demand, Ethical World Energy Demand, Depleted Uranium and the Centuries to Come

Guest Post by NNadir (who blogs occasionally at Daily Kos, profile here). This is a long but really interesting post. If you’d rather a PDF version, click here. The International Energy Agency (IEA) released last year, 2013, a free PDF brochure, available online, entitled “Key World Energy Statistics”[1] which reports total world energy consumption, comparing […]

Categories
Climate Change Nuclear Policy Renewables

It’s time for environmentalists to give nuclear a fair go

This is an article by me and Corey Bradshaw, published today in The Conversation. I’m republishing it here. Should nuclear energy be part of Australia’s (and many other countries’) future energy mix? We think so, particularly as part of a solution to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and prevent dangerous climate change. But there are other […]

Categories
Climate Change Emissions Future Nuclear Policy Renewables

An Open Letter to Environmentalists on Nuclear Energy

Professor Barry W. Brook, Chair of Environmental Sustainability, University of Tasmania, Australia. barry.brook@utas.edu.au Professor Corey J.A. Bradshaw, Sir Hubert Wilkins Chair of Climate Change, The Environment Institute, The University of Adelaide, Australia. corey.bradshaw@adelaide.edu.au An Open Letter to Environmentalists: As conservation scientists concerned with global depletion of biodiversity and the degradation of the human life-support system […]

Categories
Emissions Nuclear Policy Renewables

Nuclear power to do the heavy lifting in reducing China’s greenhouse gas emissions

he exact mix of nuclear with renewable energy will be for individual countries to decide. China clearly sees a great advantage in using significantly more nuclear in the future to reduce its use of coal. Hopefully, the actual mix in each country would be driven more by cost and reliability than ideology and politics.